Day 1

I promise future titles for the 30 Day Typography Challenge won’t be so lame.

I expected this to be much easier for me than it was. See, when I say I love typography, I should really be saying that I love looking at typography. Appreciation is easy, execution is frustrating at times. While working on the song for today, I was reminded that design is this intricate process, where the best solution usually doesn’t come until version…10 or something. Maybe v150.3 in my case. Seldom are my creativity and instincts so sharp that I can hit a home run on the first attempt (story of my life, actually). Nope, it’s try and try again. I originally started with a plan. I chose the song, the typeface, created a grid and then planned to rely on my typography and layout skills that I nurtured and developed in my undergrad. It would be bada-bing bada-boom! Or like the four game sweep Vancouver was expecting in the first round of Hockey Playoffs.

But! No.

Like game 5 in the first series, it didn’t happen that quickly or effortlessly. I started, put my elements on my page, formatted, edited, played around with the elements again, but always had a nagging feeling that something was off. The typeface didn’t really match the mood of the song, the structure didn’t seem right, and nothing felt organic or on point. I would change the font size for one element and then felt like the entire piece would have to be tweaked. Then I realized that was the beauty (and the frustration) of this challenge – I was learning how to use type to express personality and emotion, and there’s never really a “right” or definable answer. There’s a lot of trial and error and it’s subjective. This project also brought out my perfectionist tendencies. Part of my frustration was thinking that it had to be perfect, or spot on (I’m sure I can do a lot of kerning and tweaking still) but it is what is. Perfect, done.

First one done. Another 29 to go.

Type: Effloresce Antique found on dafont.com.

Song:  Roads by Portishead

 

 

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